Liberty Cove House Staff 2

Name : 

Satoko Benard

Satoko

Position : 

Liberty Cove House Concierge Supervisor

Profile: 

Having grown up in Yokosuka.

I have lived in Atlanta for a few years with my husband

Hobby:

Gardening I grow a lot of vegetables in my garden

Things I am into lately:

Lately I have been interested in taking trips, and want to visit a bunch of places both abroad and in Japan. Exercises at the gym to stay healthy. My exercise program involves a dozen push-ups and a onekilometer jog.

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Message to our customers:

 I will always provide the best service anytime as a concierge. I sincerely hospitality and I want to keep in touch with customers. Please ask me if there is anything I can do for you.

 

 

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Liberty Cove House Staff 1

Name : 

Mikio Matsui

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Position : 

Assistant Manager

Profile: 

  • Over 25 years’ experience in lodging industry.
  • Completed a hotel management course offered by Sanno Junior College.
  • Highly experienced in front desk operations.
  • Lived in New Zealand on a working holiday visa.
  • Worked at a Japanese restaurant while attending a language school.

Hobby:

Skydiving, Skiing, Climbing and Karaoke

 Surf & Snow in Naeba (2) Surf & Snow in Naeba Toki no Sumika Toki no Sumika (2)

Things I am into lately:

I have been challenging real estate qualification exams for several years.

In 2017, I passed the Real Estate Transaction Agent(宅地建物取引士)examination and the Licensed Property Manager(賃貸不動産経営管理士)examination.

I took the Administrative Manager(管理業務主任者)exam in 2018 and unfortunately failed.

I took the Administrative Manager(管理業務主任者)exam on December 1, 2019 and probably passed.

The results will be announced on January 17, 2020.

I intend to take the Condominium Manager(マンション管理士)exam in 2020 with an average pass rate of 7.9%.

If I pass this Condominium Manager(マンション管理士)exam, I will pass all three real estate(不動産三冠資格)examinations.

Passing prayer ema Success celebration

Message to our customers:

I was born in Yokohama which is right next city of Yokosuka and I still live here. I provide you latest events and Japanese culture during your stay at Liberty Cove House. I  accommodate our tenant with over 25 years’ experience in this industry. If anything concerns you, please feel free to talk to me. I am happy to help you.

 

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New Year in Japan

In Japanese, New Year is called “Osho-gatsu” and it is very important for the Japanese people. There are many events and customs to celebrate New Year’s Day. People decorate their houses with special decorations. Our Liberty Cove House has “Kadomatsu” (Bamboo) at our entrance. “Kagami-mochi” (rice cakes) to appreciate and eat as a token wellbeing.

Adults put money in a special envelope and give it to children. It is called “Otoshidama”. Kids are very excited to have them. Many people go to shirines to make wishes for the coming year. This event is called “Hatsu mode”

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Wishing you a Happy New Year!

Thank you for all your support in 2019! Wishing you a Happy New Year! Best wishes from team Liberty Cove House.

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Decoration for Japanese New Year!

For Japanese New Year, we put an ornament called “Kadomatsu” in front of Liberty Cove House and Liberty House Yokosuka’s gates

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Celebrate NYE 2020 at Our Roof top garden

We open our Roof Top Garden for our residents to view the countdown fireworks on December 31st!


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Japanese Convenience Store

You see many convenience stores in Japan. It is almost every block you can find. Japanese people use convenience stores almost every day. We use quick shopping or buy things late at night – but not only that – Japanese convenience stores have many other handy uses.

You can do photocopies, scanning and fax functions with their copy machine. You can sometime print our your photos from digital cameras. You can purchase various kinds of ticket – such as train, air plain, concert ticket and so on. 24-hour ATMs are available. Some stores provide Wi-Fi. You can pay bill for utilities. They have shipping services.

Lately all different kinds of convenience stores compete original unique food. You can actually find quality food.

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Etiquette at meal in Japan

The most important table etiquette in Japan is saying, “Itadaki-masu” before a meal and “Gochisou-sama” after a meal. These phrases mean thanks for the food and also indicate the beginning and the ending of a meal.

It is a Japanese custom to make some slurping noises while eating noodles such as Soba, udon, and somen. People say it tastes better if they make slurping noises.

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Shiwasu-another name for December in Japan

In Japan we call December “Shiwasu” which literally means teachers or priests run.

It is an expression ‘we are very busy like a bee’.

It means usually teachers or priests don’t run even if they are busy, but in December they run around the town busily.

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Momiji-Gari Autumn Leaf Hunting

From mid-September to early December, people go out to the mountainous countryside to see autumn leaves, an activity which is called “Autumn leaf hunting,” or momiji-gari. The three most important annuallyconsiderations for people wishing to enjoy momiji-gari are: the timing, finding a place where the atmosphere and scenery match the autumn leaves, and the convenience of the location. People also enjoy combining the viewing of autumn leaves with other activities, such as using a public bath, or onsen.

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